Flowers (2002)
   

 

    flowers
     
    Artists: Kate Southworth and Patrick Simons
    Medium/form: Aural visual generative work
    Length: Sound 3:39 looped/generative visuals (available on DVD only)
    Encounter: Non-interactive
    Display: View online and DVD
     
    Online elements
    Flowers Grids # 1 (2007)
URL: http://www.gloriousninth.net//flowers_grids_no_1.html
     
    Flowers Grid Description
URL: Description http://www.gloriousninth.net/flowers_grid_decription.html
     
    Ritual Beadaries (2007)
URL: Ritual Beadaries http://www.gloriousninth.net/ritual_beadaries.html
     
   

Flowers consists of generative visuals and sound, and is intended to be shown in a gallery context. The visuals are projected onto a wall or screen, and the sound speakers are positioned some distance from the visuals. The visuals and sound are stored on DVD and not available online.

The visuals for Flowers consist of discrete elements that are stored in a database until called into action at runtime by algorithms. A swarm of images cascades up and down the screen, emerging and fading as the work unfolds.  Whilst the music is finite, lasting 3’ 39’’ but looped to give the impression of being continuous, the visuals evolve and transform ongoingly.  There is no way to know what happens at the ‘end’ of the piece, simply because there is no end.  There are aspects of it that are unknown and unknowable.

Flowers Grids #1 is a series of still images captured from the unfolding generative work which give a sense of the dynamic transformation between elements as they interact with each other. A Ritual Beadary was used to select moments on screen to capture. Flowers Grids description provides information on how the first grid was devised.

Made out of Papier-mâché Ritual Beadaries provide a physical means of keeping count of the number of digital screen images captured as Flowers unfolded. The fingers of one hand were moved along the beads as the other hand clicked the computer keys to take each image. By engaging in the purposeful act of selecting moments on the screen to capture, and by not having to keep track of the count mentally, the mind is supposedly freed to encounter invisible aspects of the work.